Basic Oatmeal Bowl

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Oatmeal is about as basic as you can get when it comes to breakfast. Its creation originated in Eastern Europe approximately 3000 years ago. Its Latin name is Aveena Sativa, which I think happens to sound so lovely! This grain was once thought to be a weed and seen a “diseased version of wheat” by the Greeks and Romans. Contrary to much confusion, oats are actually gluten free, unless produced in a facility which cross-contaminates its products with gluten and/or wheat. Please be aware of this if you suffer from Celiac Disease or are highly gluten/wheat intolerant.

Let’s talk benefits!

Heart Health

Today, oats are prized for their numerous health benefits, such as high fiber content (both soluble and insoluble), which happens to reduce cholesterol in the body, particularly LDL cholesterol (the one that’s “bad”).

Weight Loss and Maintenance

The fiber also helps regulate blood sugar spikes, keeping us feeling fuller for longer periods. This is helpful for those who are looking to lose or maintain their weight, as well as those who have Type I or II diabetes.

Gastrointestinal Health

Naturally high in fiber, oats provide an excellent source of pre-biotics for our probiotic gut flora to eat and proliferate. Probiotic health in the gastrointestinal system is important for digestion, absorption and assimilation of nutrients. Oats are also anti-inflammatory, which is soothing for our digestive tracts.

Hormonal Regulation

Oat consumption causes our bodies to produce luteinizing hormone, a hormone secreted by your anterior pituitary gland responsible for the release of testosterone, estrogen and progesterone. These hormones are important for regulating mood, libido and healthy menstrual cycles in women.

Itch Relief

If you’ve recently been rummaging in the woods and happened to get a nasty poison ivy rash, or are experiencing an itchy, allergic reaction of some sort, oats can help you! Oats are anti-pruritic (a fancy word for anti-itch), and if made in a paste with water or consumed orally, can help relieve even the most intense itching. Those who experience eczema can greatly benefit from daily consumption and topical use of this herb.

Nutrition

Oats are high in manganese, molybdenum and contain a modest amount of phosphorus, copper, biotin, thiamine, magnesium, fiber, chromium and zinc. Each of these micronutrients are essential to our health and well-being. Regarding macronutrients, they are low in fat, moderate in protein and highest in complex carbohydrates. Complex carbohydrates take longer to break down in the body, which adds to our fullness factor.

Cost

This crop is super affordable for anyone and everyone! You can even get organic oats for a pretty pinchable penny in my opinion.

Okay, now that the education is out of the way, let’s move on to our oatmeal!

Prep Time 2-4 min
Cook Time 3-6 min
Total Time 10 min
Serving Size 1

Ingredients

  • ½ cup whole grain oats (I use large flake ones)
  • 1-1 ½ cups water for boiling
  • ¼ cup blueberries
  • ¼ cup strawberries
  • ½ tbsp. pumpkin seeds
  • ½ tbsp. hemp seeds
  • ¼ cup organic soy/almond/rice milk
  • Cinnamon to taste


Directions

  1. In a saucepan, bring your water to a boil.
  2. Add dry oats to the saucepan and lower your heat to minimum/pre-medium (this is usually 2 or 3 for me).
  3. Allow oats to cook for 3-6 minutes depending on how mushy or dense you like them
  4. Once cooked, drain the water into a separate glass container (I actually drink this as a soothing tonic or save it for later to add to a smoothie or tea)
  5. Place saucepan of oats back on to stovetop
  6. Add your nut milk of choice and stir into oat mixture
  7. Add cinnamon
  8. Transfer contents to bowl
  9. Top with blueberries, strawberries, pumpkin seeds and hemp seeds
  10. Enjoy!


Notes

Needless to say, this recipe can always be altered by the addition or subtraction of various ingredients to differ their nutrient content. Should you want to increase the protein content of this meal, protein powder and/or additional protein-dense seeds or nuts can be added. More fruit is always a nice idea if you desire!


Nutritional Information

Serving size: 1 bowl
Calories: 280
Fat: 7 g
Saturated fat: 1 g
Polyunsaturated fat: 4 g
Monounsaturated fat: 2 g
Trans fat: 0 g
Carbohydrates: 43 g
Fiber: 7g
Sugar: 10 g
Protein: 11 g
Sodium: 19 mg
Potassium: 323 mg
Vitamin A: 3%
Vitamin C: 77%
Calcium: 9%
Iron: 19%


References

  1. Extraction and purification of a substance with luteinizing hormone releasing activity from the leaves of Avena sativa.Fukushima M, Watanabe S, Kushima K – Tohoku J. Exp. Med. – June 1, 1976; 119 (2); 115-22MEDLINE is the source for the citation and abstract for this record
  2. Gowan, M. (2016). Botanical Medicine 100 – Actions [PowerPoint slides]
  3. World’s Healthiest Foods. Oats. (2017) http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=nutrient&dbid=45

 

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